1,000 Books Before Kindergarten

1,000 Books Before Kindergarten provides parents and caregivers with a fun and exciting way to get kids ready for kindergarten. The most important thing is to read aloud every day. This will give children the skills and tools they need to be ready to read in kindergarten and be more successful in school.

2024 news…
We’ve updated the program – now for every 100 books your child reads, they’ve earned another free book!

It’s so easy to get started… just print out the log sheet below, read 100 books then visit the Library to pick up your free book earned…and keep reading to 1,000!  Be sure to track your child’s progress on the display in our Play Corner too.

Pick up a program welcome packet on your next visit.  See Mrs. Flynn if you have any questions.

This program is generously funded by the Friends of the Library.

Reading Records
Reading sheet
Reading log option

If you read …

  • 1 book a day for 3 years… it’s 1,095 books!
  • 10 books a week for 2 years… 1,040 books!
  • 3 books a day for 1 year… 1,095 books!

Helpful tips and skills to raise a reader
Talking, singing, reading, writing, and playing with families and friends (and at the library) are also great ways to help children get ready to read.

  • Talking with children helps them learn oral language, one of the most critical early literacy skills. The experience of self-expression also stimulates brain development, which underlies all learning. Skills: concepts about print, alphabet knowledge, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and narrative skills
  • Singing – which also includes rhyming – increases children’s awareness of and sensitivities to the sounds in words. This helps prepare children to decode print (written language). Skills: alphabet knowledge, phonological awareness, and vocabulary
  • Reading together, or shared reading, remains the single most effective way to help children become proficient readers. Skills: concepts about print, alphabet knowledge, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and narrative skills
  • Writing and reading go together. Writing helps children learn that letters and words stand for sounds and that print has meaning. Skills: concepts about print, alphabet knowledge, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and narrative skills
  • Play is one of the primary ways young children learn about the world. General knowledge is an important literacy skill that helps children understand books and stories once they begin to read. Skills: concepts about print, alphabet knowledge, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and narrative skills